Comcast’s injecting ads for their own services, now→

Consumerist:

BB knows that sometimes customers can indeed be left out in the cold by using old tech — just ask all those people who had to scramble for digital antennas and cable boxes when that changeover happened — so he called Comcast to ask exactly what he was missing out on with his old modem. He says the support rep would only tell him that he wasn’t enjoying the full benefits of the upgraded modem, but failed to provide any real technical info about what this meant.
“Now they’ve moved to more aggressive measures to try to get me to upgrade,” writes BB. “The other day as I was browsing the web on my phone, on my home WiFi, I got a pop-up notice while browsing on wired.com.”

Apparently watching this same sort of tech result in massive consumer backlash for other companies didn’t scare them.
I’ll point out that it’s a valid point that they’re trying to make, maybe: we got a new modem/router1 from our ISP recently, and wound up going to the store and buying a new one because the built-in wifi didn’t work. At all.
A couple days ago we finally got around to calling them and asking them to take it back since we bought our own. Evidently there’s a firmware upgrade for the thing that fixes that issue. Except… it’s not run through the thing’s built-in ‘firmware upgrade’ menu, and the company who manufactured the thing doesn’t even list it as a product in their support center. “Oh, we have to push the update from here,” said the technician over the phone.
“So why didn’t you?”
“You need to call and ask us to.”
That’s lovely. Thanks for informing us that that would need to be done. Oh, wait, you didn’t.

If I ever wind up permanently moving out of the country, I figure about 40% of my reasoning for doing that will be “every ISP in this country is awful.”


  1. I’m not sure what to call it, because it appears to be a hybrid unit, but we’ve also got a standalone router. I think the term for this is “our ISP has no idea what they’re doing.”