Hacking Hospitals→

Bloomberg Business:

Such attacks angered device makers and hospital administrators, who say the staged hacks threatened to scare the public away from technologies that do far more good than harm. At an industry forum last year, a hospital IT administrator lost his temper, lashing out at Rios and other researchers for stoking hysteria when, in fact, not a single incident of patient harm has ever been attributed to lax cybersecurity in a medical device. “I appreciate you wanting to jump in,” Rick Hampton, wireless communications manager for Partners HealthCare System, said, “but frankly, some of the National Enquirer headlines that you guys create cause nothing but problems.” Another time, Rios was shouted at by device vendors on a conference call while dozens of industry executives and federal officials listened in. “It wasn’t just someone saying, ‘Hey, you suck,’ or something,” Rios remembers, “but truly, literally, screaming.”

“Hey, this thing is broken and it could be a really big problem one day.”
“STOP TRYING TO CREATE A PANIC ABOUT NOTHING”
What a reasonable response that is.